Social justice looks like O.U.T.K.A.S.T.

Open-minded Thinking

A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities should provoke contemplation and reflection. It should provide students with the cognitive skills and facts to help them think critically about the knowledge they receive, as well as provide opportunities for students and teachers to practice truth-telling as a means for enhancing their civic engagement and social justice capacities.  We call it authentic leadership, i.e. “leadership that keeps it real.”

Uprightness

A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities evokes a spirit of honor within the art and science of teaching and learning. We believe the ultimate goal for both youth and youth influencers – when engaging in social justice pedagogy – should ultimately lead to living in “right standing”. So, when designing lessons, administering tests, or applying standards, Hip Hop-inspired practitioners stand firm on the outcomes having a positive and direct impact on the day-to-day survival of the student.

Truth

A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities inspires a belief in fair and just educational opportunities for everyone. Not just a select few. The practice of “doing justice” and learning to be socially-aware of the injustices that surround us – particularly in learning environments – equips youth and youth influencers with a compassion (rather than a tolerance) and awareness for societal challenges. School environments are ripe environments where youth and youth influencers can problem-solve ways to alleviate racial, economic, gender, and other socially-constructed inequities.

Kinship

Reciprocity promotes collaboration. A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities believes the practice of schooling and education requires the co-generation of knowledge between youth and youth influencers. The curation of artifacts based on the learning is also essential to showing the reciprocity in the design. Learning is not a one-dimensional action. Neither is teaching. For example, in a Hip Hop community of practice, teachers are not as effective if they are not learning from their students. We also believe students engage more in the system of learning when they contribute and communicate what is being taught. The ideal learning environment is one that practices “balance in the give and take” – i.e. reciprocity – where the teacher and the student shift between their primary roles.

Accountability

A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities believes in the promotion and cultivation of equitable learning environments. These environments should be safe and designed to promote cultural resilience and responsiveness from multiple perspectives.  For example, to practice Hip Hop and leverage it as a learning design is to practice collaboration in the critique and construction of knowledge. To use cultural artifacts to extract, analyze, interrogate, and synthesize concepts and themes across a social justice and civic engagement curriculum.

Sequence

A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities focuses on enhancing the spirit, the self, and ultimately the society from which youth and youth influencers live. This begins with practicing “knowledge of self”: the development of one’s character as superordinate to the development of one’s technical capacities. As a student learns about their gifts and talents, they are better equipped with how to enhance and utilize their personal and professional skills and how to contribute them to creating what King calls “the Beloved Community.”

Teach Love

A learning design that meets at the nexus of culture, media, and technology and centered on the cultivation of social justice literacies and civic engagement capacities TEACHES LOVE as the guiding principle for teaching and learning. We believe that the practice of love must live in the classroom and any attempt to remove it is the beginning of the end for the youth and youth influencer. Love that breeds patience in learning is a necessary ingredient for assembling a harmonious environment where students and teachers can thrive together and work for the betterment of the educational environment that they share.

“U, Black Maybe” Class Lesson

“U, Black Maybe” Class Lesson

“The MC In You”: The Class Lesson

“The MC In You”: The Class Lesson

YEEZY TAUGHT ME: Lesson 3

YEEZY TAUGHT ME: Lesson 3

HipHop2020 Testimonials


I think it stirred up an interest for the deeper meanings of hip hop. And offered opportunities on campus to hear from those in the industry about various aspects of the business and their journeys.

Steven Francis, Audit Associate, Deloitte & Touche

Now, I look at an artist as more than the lyrics of their songs. They are the sum of their experiences just like any other person and their music serves as a mirror of their lives.

Daniel Edwards, Owner, Daniel Davis Edwards Productions, LLC

Hip hop had been speaking to me growing up and the first time I remember speaking back was in high school. Being involved with HipHop2020 in college and while in graduate school kept hip hop culture and its authentic premise in the forefront of my mind. Whenever I am working with youth, developing curriculum, writing a play, or book, hip hop is incorporated somehow.

Zaneta J. Smith, Founder, Good Works Consultants; Former White House Intern

HipHop2020 influenced my life by providing me with an entirely new lens to approach hip hop culture. My current job requires me to leverage cultural insights in order to help brands thrive in contemporary culture. In order to fully understand contemporary culture, it is crucial to understand the historical context behind how these movements began. HipHop2020 provided me not only with the ability to intelligently articulate how powerful cultural movements in hip hop began, but also the foresight to anticipate how they will unfold in the future.

Geoff McHenry, Manager of Cultural Experiences, Translation LLC

Ma'atic hip hop and the seven principles I learned as part of HipHop2020 are the official driving forces that helped launch my career. They guide my decision-making and have enhanced my leadership skills in the corporate entertainment world. As a young African American female it has been my goal to prove that I can be dominant in this industry against the odd of the glass ceiling theory. My hip hop imagination will always impact my work-life decisions and is a constant reminder to remain humble yet hungry.

Lauryn Hampton, Researcher/Production Assistant, The Dr. Phil Show

HipHop2020 helped me understand that hip hop is not just music but it is a lifestyle. It is a lifestyle that prior to taking the class I thought was monolithic. HipHop2020 allowed me to truly see what my passion and purpose is in life. Without HipHop2020 I might be sitting in someone's office crunching numbers instead of impacting youth daily.

Brandon Frame, Director of Business Partnerships and Development, High School Inc

In focusing on culturally responsive pedagogy and critical pedagogy, hip hop based pedagogy provided a vital, living link from theory to practice. My hip hop imagination gives me a new lens to view classroom practice from every angle, in every context. My developing imagination has led me to look for hip hop culture in the rural classrooms that surround me. Hip hop is real, relevant, and speaking to my students...how can I deny that power?

Paige Hayes Horst, Doctoral student, Curriculum and Instruction, Virginia Tech

I had the blessing of meeting Dr. Wilson as a senior at Morehouse as I prepared to go to film school. It was in her class that I refined my views on culture and further grasped concepts that have influenced my vision as a filmmaker. She is a trailblazer and had inspired me completely.

Julius Pryor IV, NYU Film School